A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

Recent entries:
Entry forthcoming (5/24)
“I stood waving at my neighbor for 10 minutes before realizing she was just cleaning her windows” (5/24)
Entry forthcoming (5/24)
“Memorial Day—honor their deaths by questioning anyone calling for more of them” (5/24)
“I’m going to unlike this page. Right after I post about unliking this page…” (5/24)
More new entries...

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Entry from June 01, 2005
Bouncer
The "bouncer" is American slang and appears to have originated in New York. In England, the same person might have been called a "chucker-out."

(Oxford English Dictionary)
bouncer
One engaged to eject undesirable or unruly persons from a saloon, ballroom, etc.; a 'chucker-out'. colloq. (orig. U.S.).

1865 Nat. Police Gaz. (U.S.) 29 Apr. 4/2 Old Moyamensing is almost as famous for its lawless gangs of boys and young men, as it was in the days of the 'killers' and 'bouncers'. 1883 Daily News 26 July 4/8 The Bouncer..is merely the English 'chucker out'. When liberty verges on licence and gaiety on wanton delirium, the Bouncer selects the gayest of the gay, andbounces him. 1888 A. C. GUNTER Mr. Potter xx, Several of the fighting brigade of the establishment, that in American slang would be termed 'bouncers'.
Posted by Barry Popik
Workers/People • (0) Comments • Wednesday, June 01, 2005 • Permalink